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Vibration Exercise Machine News

New Vibration Exercise Fitness Research Presented at the European Congress on Obesity

A new scientific study presented at the European Congress on Obesity, found that overweight or obese people who regularly used vibrating equipment with a calorie restricted diet were much more successful at long term weight-loss and losing the fat around their abdomen compared to those who combined dieting with a more conventional fitness routine.

"These machines are increasingly found in gyms across the industrialized world and have gathered a devoted following in many places, but there has not been any studies proving that they help people lose weight. Our study, the first to investigate the effects of vibration in obese people, indicates it's a very promising approach. It looks like these machines could be a useful addition to a weight control package," said the study's leader, Dirk Vissers, a physiotherapist at the Artesis University College and the University of Antwerp in Belgium.

The researchers divided the study group into four groups.

DIET GROUP: One group was prescribed an individually calculated calorie restricted diet. Dietician visits were scheduled every 2 weeks for the first 90 days and every 30 days for the second 90 days. The dieters were instructed not to undertake any exercise for the duration of the 6 month........

New research study backs up the vibration fitness experts and finds Vibration Exercise machines help to shed weight and even reduce harmful belly fat


Vibration Exercise Study Proves Positive

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

PR Log (Press Release) – Dec 08, 2009 – A new scientific study presented at the European Congress on Obesity, found that overweight or obese people who regularly used vibrating equipment with a calorie restricted diet were much more successful at long term weight-loss and losing the fat around their abdomen compared to those who combined dieting with a more conventional fitness routine.

"These machines are increasingly found in gyms across the industrialized world and have gathered a devoted following in many places, but there has not been any studies proving that they help people lose weight. Our study, the first to investigate the effects of vibration in obese people, indicates it's a very promising approach. It looks like these machines could be a useful addition to a weight control package," said the study's leader, Dirk Vissers, a physiotherapist at the Artesis University College and the University of Antwerp in Belgium.

The researchers divided the study group into four groups.

DIET GROUP: One group was prescribed an individually calculated calorie restricted diet. Dietician visits were scheduled every 2 weeks for the first 90 days and every 30 days for the second 90 days. The dieters were instructed not to undertake any exercise for the duration of the 6 month study.

DIET PLUS EXERCISE GROUP: The second group received the same diet instructions, with the addition of a traditional fitness program. They attended supervised exercise classes twice a week for an hour and were instructed to exercise a third time each week. Their exercise included cycling, swimming, running, step aerobics and some weight lifting exercises.

CONTROL GROUP: A third control group got no diet or exercise instructions.

DIET PLUS VIBRATION EXERCISE GROUP: The fourth group got the diet instructions plus supervised Vibration Plate training instead of conventional exercise. They were instructed not to do any aerobic exercise during the six-month study period. The physiotherapists gradually increased the speed and intensity of the Vibration Training each week, as well as the variety and duration of the vibration exercises from 30 seconds for each of 10 exercises to 60 seconds for each of 22 exercises, such as squats, lunges, calf raises, push-ups and abdominal crunches. The average time spent on the vibration plate was 12 minutes per session in the first 90 days and 14 minutes in the second 90 days.

THE RESULTS
Over the year, only the conventional fitness and vibration groups managed to maintain a 5% weight loss, which is what is considered enough to improve health.

DIET GROUP: During the first six months, the diet only group lost about 6% of their initial body weight, but could not maintain a 5% weight loss in the subsequent six months. The diet group had a visceral fat loss of 24.3 square centimetres after six months but were unable to maintain the loss and dropped down to only 7.5 square centimetres after a year.

DIET PLUS EXERCISE GROUP: The group that got diet plus conventional fitness lost about 7% of their initial body weight in the first six months, and by the end of the study, they had managed to keep off a 6.9% loss. Visceral fat shrank by 18 square centimetres in the conventional fitness group in the first six months, but by the end of the year, it was only 1.6 square centimetres less than at the beginning. Not very impressive.

CONTROL GROUP: The control group predictively gained about 1.5% of their original body weight.

DIET PLUS VIBRATION EXERCISE GROUP: Finally vibration exercise group lost 11% of their body weight during the intervention phase and by the end of the follow-up period they had maintained a 10.5% loss. The vibration fitness group lost 48 square centimetres of visceral fat during the first six months and still had the impressive loss of 48 square centimetres after 12 months.

These are very encouraging results, and this could be a viable alternative to traditional exercise and weight lifting. Vissers explained that the plate works by making muscles rapidly contract, which builds lean muscle mass. People say vibration exercise machines are fitness for lazy people. It may feel like a short cut, but it is real exercise.

Vissers plans further research on a larger group of obese patients confirm how beneficial the machines are. His team is also planning to study why vibration seems to be more effective than aerobic exercise in trimming visceral fat, including whether increased blood flow to the abdomen and hormonal response to vibration might play a role in more efficient fat breakdown. His study was funded by the Artesis University College of Antwerp.

The results were presented at ECO 2009 -- The 17th European Congress on Obesity in Amsterdam, Netherlands.
SOURCES: ECO 2009 -- The 17th European Congress on Obesity, Amsterdam, Netherlands, 2009. News release, ECO 2009 - The 17th European Congress on Obesity.

Source - PRLOG.org


A new study by Oregon State University researchers shows that Whole Body Vibration slows the acquisition of fat, and may also positively impact bone density.

The publication can be found in the latest issue of the International Journal of Obesity. August 25, 2009

Researcher Gianni Maddalozzo with OSU’s Department of Nutrition and Exercise Science looked at the effects of whole body vibration on 7-month-old rats that were placed on vibration platforms at OSU’s Bone Research Laboratory. Both groups were fed the same diet and kept in a sedentary environment. One group was put on the vibration platform for 30 minutes a day, five days a week for 12 weeks. The other group was not put on the platform.

“After 12 weeks, the whole-body vibration group weighed less, showed no changes in lean muscle mass, and had a lower overall percentage of body fat than the age-matched non-vibration group,” Maddalozzo said. “Over the course of the study the vibrated rats were healthy, tolerated the vibration well and exhibited no obvious signs of distress following adaptation to vibration.”

Maddalozzo said prevention is often the key to preventing obesity in society. More than 50 percent of adults in the United States do not get enough physical activity. Recent studies suggest that whole-body vibration has been proposed as a potential alternative, or adjuvant, to exercise. Whole-body vibration has been reported to increase energy metabolism through an increased oxygen uptake to values comparable to moderate walking.
“Vibration increases energy expenditure,” Maddalozzo said. “It’s equivalent to walking at moderate intensity.”

While not a magic bullet solution to weight gain, Maddalozzo said that whole body vibration has promise as another tool that can be used to help keep weight off. And past studies at research institutions such as the Societa Stampa Sportiva in Rome and at Stony Brook University in New York have already shown that vibration platform regimes have a significant effect on bone formation and muscle strength. Building on that research, Maddalozzo is involved in a human study with older adults who have had hip replacement surgery. He plans to publish his results in 2009.

Vibration Training has been shown to improve strength and balance in older women,” he said. “Vibration training can give you the same results as a moderate-intensity workout.”


Provided by OSU


CAN VIBRATION EXERCISE PLATES SHAKE OFF WEIGHT?

If Used Properly, Vibration Plates Trim Belly Fat and Spur Weight Loss, Study Says

By Jennifer Warner - Reviewed by Louise Chang, MD

May 11, 2009 -- If used properly, Vibration Plate machines may help overweight or obese people trim their belly fat and achieve long-term weight loss.

A new study shows that obese women who followed a weight loss diet and regularly used the vibration plate machines were more successful at long-term weight loss and losing hard-to-trim belly fat than those who combined dieting with a more conventional exercise routine.

“These are very encouraging results, but it doesn’t mean people trying to lose weight can ditch aerobic exercise and jump on the vibration plate instead. They still need a healthy diet and aerobic exercise, but this could be a viable alternative to weightlifting,” researcher Dirk Vissers, a physiotherapist at the Artesis University College and the University of Antwerp in Belgium, says in a news release.

Researchers say the machines are becoming increasingly common in gyms and have gained a devoted following, but until now there has not been any evidence that they help with weight loss.
Vibrating Fights Fat

In the study, researchers looked at the effects of using vibration plate machines in combination with a calorie-reduced diet in achieving weight loss in 61 obese or overweight adults, mostly women.

The participants were divided into four groups: diet alone, diet plus vibration plate exercise program, diet plus conventional exercise program of cycling, swimming,running, and other activities, and a control group that did nothing.

The vibration plate training consisted of physical therapist-supervised exercises performed on the machines, such as squats, lunges, calf raises, push-ups, and abdominal crunches. The duration of the exercises gradually intensified from 30 seconds for each of 10 exercises to 60 seconds for each of 22 exercises.

Each group followed its program for six months and was then asked to continue on its own with diet and exercise for another six months. Besides monitoring participants' weight, deep belly fat was measured by abdominal CT scans during the study period.

“Over the year, only the conventional fitness and vibration groups managed to maintain a 5% weight loss, which is what is considered enough to improve health,” Vissers says.

Overall, the vibration plate group lost the highest percentage of weight with an average loss of 11% of their body weight in the first six months and maintained a 10.5% loss after a year compared to a 7% initial body weight loss in the diet and conventional exercise group, which maintained a 6.9% loss.

In addition, the vibration plate group lost the most belly fat and kept it off for the entire year compared to the other three groups.

“People say vibration machines are fitness for lazy people. It may feel like a short cut, but if it’s easy, you are not doing it properly,” Vissers says. “Supervision in the beginning is imperative and the longer the better. What we see in gyms very often -- people just standing on the machine holding the handles -- is not going to do anything.”

The results were presented at ECO 2009 -- The 17th European Congress on Obesity in Amsterdam, Netherlands.

WebMD Health News


 

Build a Stronger Skeleton

To have sturdy, healthy bones, you gotta beat 'em up.
By Martin F. Downs
WebMD Feature
Reviewed by Gary D. Vogin, MD

To build bone, you have to beat it up.

Your bones are nothing like the frame of a building. If a skyscraper's steel skeleton is shaken by an earthquake, it weakens. But shocks to bone only make it stronger. Bone is living tissue, and it responds to your activities. Mechanical stress -- the impact of your feet pounding pavement, the weight of a barbell, or the shock that travels up your arm when you whack a baseball -- creates microscopic fractures. Your bone not only repairs the tiny fractures, but it also responds by building more bone on top of them.

Doctors have known this for over a century, ever since a German surgeon named Julius Wolff proposed the idea, which became known as Wolff's Law.

Most of us, however, are ignorant of how our bones behave. "I don't think this information has really hit people," says Nicholas DiNubile, an orthopedic surgeon in suburban Philadelphia. He consults for the Pennsylvania Ballet and the 76ers basketball team about their bones.

If you hope to live to a ripe old age and be active during your golden years, you must pay heed to Wolff's Law.

This is especially true for women. After menopause, women start to lose a lot of bone. The end result can be osteoporosis: bones so brittle that even the stress of ordinary activities can snap them. Men aren't immune, either. The rapid bone loss that leads to osteoporosis starts about 10 years later in men -- around age 60.

DiNubile says it is crucial to build up as much bone as you can during the first 20-30 years of your life, so that when you reach the age when bone loss accelerates, the effect won't be devastating. He compares it to investing in the stock market. If you have $1 million and you lose 90% of it in a market crash, you're still left with more than most people earn in a year. If you've only invested $10,000, what's left probably couldn't cover a month's rent.

Train Smart

To build healthy bones, you need the raw material calcium. Eating foods rich in calcium is a good start, but you also have to make sure your bones can use it. You may get enough calcium in your diet, but you rob your bones of it if you drink lots of soda. The phosphorus in soft drinks inhibits calcium absorption.

Then you have to punish your skeleton a bit. Low-impact activities such as walking, swimming, and cycling are good for your heart and muscle tone, but they don't do much for your bones. High-impact activities such as running and weightlifting build bone. "I think strength training is the key here," DiNubile says.

Moderation is important, too. "It's exercise as medicine," DiNubile says. All medicines must be taken at the right dose. Too little has no effect; too much causes awful side effects.

Women who overdo it may develop a condition called amenorrhea, which is triggered when overall body fat drops below 15%-17%. This is basically exercise-induced menopause. An amenorrheic woman stops menstruating and her estrogen levels take a dive. With low estrogen levels, bone loss speeds up, just like it does in post-menopausal women. Many female athletes, DiNubile says, are pleased with their lean, cover-girl bodies, "Yet they're not healthy. They've got disease.

"You need to train smart," he says. You should maintain a healthy weight -- not too plump, but not too hard -- and allow your bone enough time between workouts to heal and grow.

Good Vibrations

Clinton Rubin, PhD, a scientist at the State University of New York in Stony Brook, thinks he may have found another way to build bone: whole body vibration. His experiments have shown that gentle, high-frequency vibrations greatly increase bone growth. In a recent study, he had sheep stand on a vibrating platform for 20 minutes, five days a week, over the course of one year. The density and volume of their leg bones increased by more than 30%.

Rubin's research is funded by NASA's National Space Biomedical Research Institute. NASA is interested because bone loss is a bane to astronauts. According to Rubin, we lose about 2% of our bone per decade here on Earth. Astronauts lose about 2% of their bone per month in space. Under no stress from gravity, bone dissolves. "It's doing exactly what it thinks it should do," Rubin says. That is, a weightless body doesn't really need bones. It's responding to the environment.

At present, both American astronauts and Russian cosmonauts try to fight bone loss with intense exercise programs. They spend four hours a day doing high-impact, bone-building workouts, Rubin says. Still, the bone loss doesn't stop.

Rubin thinks a healthy skeleton depends on the body's natural vibrations, in addition to the strain placed on bone by exercise. Even when sitting upright or standing still, your muscles are working to maintain your posture. The muscles vibrate at 10-50 hertz, and Rubin thinks these subtle vibrations stimulate bone growth. In space, a human body doesn't strain against gravity to hold its posture. The muscles are relaxed, and bone is not constantly subjected to muscular vibrations.

If Rubin is right, a vibrating platform could remove one more obstacle to sending astronauts on a mission to Mars. What's more, vibration might become a first-line treatment for osteoporosis, as well as a way to prevent it. Better treatments for osteoporosis are sorely needed. DiNubile says he worries about what will happen when today's young women go through "the change" some 40 years from now. "They're not even close on calcium intake," he says. What's more, teens tend be sedentary and guzzle massive quantities of soft drinks. All things considered, it looks like an epidemic of shattered hips may plague us mid-century.

A lot of hope was pinned on estrogen replacement therapy for postmenopausal women, but now doctors are finding out that it's unsafe. "They will not have that protector of bones," DiNubile says.

Rubin says he thinks vibration therapy would be the perfect answer -- no drugs, no side effects. "It basically relies on the normal physiology of the skeleton," he says. "What could be better?"

WebMD


Passive Exercise: Whole-Body Vibration and More

Working out while not really working is the concept behind a trend known as passive exercise. But does it really work?
By Colette Bouchez
WebMD Weight Loss Clinic-Feature
Reviewed by Louise Chang, MD

You're lying on the sofa, maybe munching a bag of chips, and watching your favorite movie on DVD.  And ... you're toning your abs? That's the picture painted by some proponents of passive exercise, a fitness trend based on the idea that you can pretty much do nothing and still work out, if you have the right equipment doing the work for you.

But could this really work? WebMD asked three experts to offer up their opinions on four of the top passive exercise trends: whole-body vibration, chi machines, electronic ab stimulators, and inversion boots. So grab that bag of veggie chips, prop up your feet, and read on -- their answers might surprise you! 

Whole-Body Vibration

By far the most popular new addition to the passive exercise category is whole-body vibration or WBV -- also known as "Power Plate" exercise.  An outgrowth of a program used to train Russian cosmonauts, it quickly spread through Europe and Japan, then hit U.S. shores -- with whole centers now devoted to this workout.

How It Works: According to physical therapist and personal trainer Ben Quist, DPT, most people stand on the platform with knees bent at about a 30-degree angle, while the surface beneath their feet vibrates an astounding 30 times per second. 

That vibration, says Quist, tricks the body into thinking you're falling. "This, in turn, activates the 'stress reflex' -- an extremely rapid muscle contraction," says Quist, owner of Form and Fitness, a Milwaukee health club and rehabilitation center, where he has been training patients on the Power Plate for over a year.  These muscle contractions, says Quist, are responsible for most of the benefits attributed to this type of exercise. 

The Promise: According to manufacturers, those benefits include increased circulation, muscle strength, and flexibility; better range of motion; core conditioning and stability; and faster muscle recovery after working out. They say the health benefits also include enhanced metabolism, increased bone mineral density, reduction of the stress hormone cortisol, elevation of human growth hormone levels, and improved lymphatic flow. Whole-body vibration is also said to reduce cellulite and stimulate collagen production for smoother skin. Manufacturers also say MBV can provide muscle toning and conditioning for those who have health restrictions that keep them from exercising, such as multiple sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, and some forms of arthritis.

What the Experts Say: While the experts who spoke with WebMD all agreed that WBV does offer benefits.

"I've seen some remarkable results in terms of bone density -- working better than conventional exercise -- plus good effects on circulation and muscle stimulation for those who can't do conventional exercise," says Quist. "But I don't think it can help you lose weight or impact cellulite. There is really no solid medical evidence backing up these or other health claims." Cedric Bryant, PhD, chief science officer of the American Council on Exercise, says while whole body vibration has potential, more research is clearly needed.

Indeed, in one study of 90 postmenopausal women published in the Journal of Bone and Mineral Research in 2004, a group of Belgian researchers found almost a 1% increase in hip bone density among users of the Power Plate form of WBV, along with measurable increase in muscle strength.  The study participants used the machine for a total of 30 minutes three times a week for six months.

In another study, published in the Journal of the American Geriatric Society, researchers found that elderly people who were not able to participate in traditional exercise saw muscle strengthening and speed-of-movement benefits from using the Power Plate.

And in a study published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, mice that were placed on a low-vibration platform for 15 minutes, five days weekly, for 15 weeks ended up with smaller torsos than a group of mice who were put on a platform that didn't vibrate -- even though all the mice ate the same amount of food.

WebMD


206 Reasons Why NASA, Russian Cosmonauts & Olympic Athletes Use Whole Body Vibration

The average adult person has 206. An infant can have up to 350 bones when he or she is born. Some of these bones fuse together as the infant grow. The skeletal system fo the human body forms the framework and basis for or form and movement. Along with joints, tendons, ligaments and muscles, these 206 bones give us the freedom to move and enjoy life.

Sadly, as most Americans age, their bone density decreases, and mobility is greatly reduced and sometimes even lost (as in the case of people bound to a wheelchair). The quality of life is very limited if your mobility is limited. If you are reading this article and you still enjoy good health and mobility, then realize that the information here could alter your future for the better. Instead of decline, your bodys bones, muscles, tendons, ligaments and joint can remain strong, flexible and fully functional up to 100 years and beyond.

JAMA (Journal of the American Medical Association) in its July issue of 2007 reported that more than 30,000 people have a hip fracture every year. And its important to note that hip fractures are one of the main reasons people end up in a nursing home. Vibration Training is the perfect exercise (as we will see next) to make your bones as strong as steel and prevent unnecessary complications like hip fractures that can occur with age.

So now we come to the connection between the Russian space program and increased strength in bones and muscles. The Russians realized that out in space away from the Earths gravity, cosmonauts experienced extremely accelerated bone and muscle loss (along with other complications like blood clots). This presented a huge problem for the duration these astronauts could remain in space.

The Russian researchers developed whole body Vibration Exercise machines as a way to counteract the lack of gravity in space by increasing the weight bearing loads via acceleration of the platform.

Whole Body Vibration exercise is a way to mimic gravity where no gravity exists, thus helping the cosmonauts to keep their bone mineral density high and their muscles strong.

Partly because of this technology the Russians shattered all the records for living the longest in space. Also instead of coming back from outer space on stretchers, the astronauts returned as strong as when they left.

Have you ever wondered why the Russians were so dominant in the Olympics in the 1980’s. That’s right, their athletes used this secret form of exercise that the rest of the world (at the time) did not know about.


Shaking up Fitness-The benefits of Total Vibration Technology
  

We’re not talking about the old school band you put around your waist or your thighs and it allegedly shakes the fat off your body. We are talking about vibration exercise technology. These next series of articles will look at the several of the benefits associated with using total vibration technology to achieve one’s fitness goals.

Before we discuss the benefits, I feel it is important to explain the piece of equipment we use to for total Vibration Training.

The vibration exercise machine is a vibrating platform that stimulates muscles 95-97% where the general population only stimulates 30-40% when doing conventional lifting. This occurs do to the unique displacement the machine places on the individual. It not only moves up and down 70% it also moves 10% in the frontal plane and 20% in the sagital plane.

Depending on the frequency (30, 35, 40, 50 hertz) or the amplitude (high/low), one can place any where from 2x to over 6x the force of gravity on the body. This is important because according to Newton’s Law: Force=Mass x Acceleration. For our purposes, force is the same as work, mass is equivalent to weight.

Normally when we want to work out harder we increases weight, thus increasing the amount of work we do. However, we decrease acceleration as we add weight. Try and move a 200 lbs bench press as quickly as you can a 100 lb bench press. With the plate, your mass (because it’s your weight) stays constant, while acceleration can increase (due to the hertz) thus forcing you to work harder.

An example: If we were to take a 70 kg person (about 150 lbs) and had him squat with no weight on the ground, the force he would exert is 700 Newton’s. Force=Mass (70kg) x Acceleration (9.81m/s2). The 9.81 m/s2 comes from the acceleration of gravity. If this person added 70kg on a barbell for a squat he would exert 1400 Newton. Take that same person and have him squat on the Vibration Machine with no weight and amplitude of high and 40 hertz he would exert 3500 Newton. You can see this is over twice the amount of work he was doing with a conventional squat.

PART 2

The first part of our “Shaking Things Up” series explained the basic concept of the Vibration Fitness Machine and how one can manipulate amplitude and hertz to obtain one’s fitness goals. In this section we will look into reasons why an individual would want to incorporate this training tool into one’s workouts.

Speaking from experience, my team and I have been using the plate to stimulate more muscle growth, bring out more definition, burn more calories, increase strength, burn fat, and help prevent osteoporosis for over 3 years.

Let us first look at the way in which the plate helps with strength. When one performs an exercise on the plate (whether it be squats, lunges, crunches, push ups, static rows, dips, etc.) the individual is not only working voluntary muscles, but also involuntary muscles. This will stimulate more muscle growth, and by using more muscles, will burn more calories as well. When an individual is on the plate for only 30 seconds and has the hertz set at 30 (this is the lowest setting) the individual will contract his muscles 900 times! This is awesome because it is working not only slow twitch muscles fibers, but more importantly to those of us looking build more in short durations (30 seconds to 1 minute), stimulates the fast twitch as well. This is unique because traditional weight training only uses one or the other. What this means is, we can make our sessions shorter thus decreasing the likelihood of over training and allowing us more time to do our cardio and/or pose.

In regards to getting more definition using the Vibration Machine, remember you are contracting the muscle 900 times just standing on the plate, so one will work more muscles and burn more calories, thus allowing more definition to be seen (keep in mind you you do need to eat properly as well).

A 6 week study of 2 groups in 2003 showed the group using vibration training three times a week in their routine had an 18% increase in their resting metabolism, while the group that did similar exercises without vibration had a 2% decline.

One of my specialties is training individuals for bodybuilding, figure, and fitness competitions. I am also the official trainer for the Miss Arizona USA and Miss Teen Arizona USA pageants, along with a majority of our clientele as regular fitness individuals. No mater your fitness goal, imagine getting ready for an event where you want to look as “tight” as possible. Wouldn’t you want your metabolism to be as high as possible in order to burn more calories and lean out quicker? This may enable you to decrease the amount of cardio you need to do and/or consume more calories. Either of which will allow you to maintain your muscle mass more efficiently. Incorporating the plate with conventional weight training and diet will enable you to achieve better results.

PART 3

The 3rd installation of our “Shaking Things Up” articles is going to look at the benefits of using total vibration in regards to increasing Human Growth Hormone production.

Studies have been done on the plate in regards to Human Growth Hormone production. This is critical for all individuals, especially those over 30 years of age.

After the age of 30, about every 5 years are bodies will decrease the production of HGH, so it is important we stimulate as much as we can naturally! This occurs by using larger muscle groups, rest, proper nutrition and the correct supplementation.

Since we are working larger and more muscles using the plate, we will increases the production of HGH. This is important because the more lean muscle one is able to maintain the more fat she/he will burn. Remember, one pound of muscle can burn 20-100 kcal a day while a lb of fat only burns 8 kcal a day. However, the plate should not take the place of proper nutrition and rest. It should be used in conjunction with.

I know many of you may think this article is too good to be true. Often times things that sound this good are. However, I invite you to try the Vibration Exercise Machine for yourself and feel the difference. I also encourage you to research vibration training and read the scientific research for yourself.

Vibration training has been around since the 19th century. In the 20th century, scientific research was conducted to understand the influence of vibration on bone density. Scientists found vibration therapy improved bone density enormously in astronauts that would normally lose bone density and experience muscle atrophy due to zero gravity. After the fall of the Iron Curtain, vibration research turned to performance among athletes and the Vibration Exercise Machine was invented and introduced to the U.S. in 2001. Since then, it has been featured in the media a number of times. From Muscle and Fitness, Iron Man, Sweat Magazine, to Good Morning America, Inside Edition, and local news people are talking about the value of training on the Vibration Exercise Machine. The Vibration Exercise Machine has also been used by several professional athletes and teams (Lance Armstrong, Chicago Bulls, Chicago White Sox, several World Cup teams, Olympic athletes) and celebrities (Madonna, Claudia Schiffer, and more).

Written by

Trainer Scott Keppel - Personal Trainer

http://www.scottstrainingsystems.com

 

 

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